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  • michelle m. davis

Natural Endings

I watched the final episode of Ted Lasso. At first, I thought it was merely the end of Season 3. While sad to have no more new shows for the next few months, I felt confident these characters, who I’ve fallen in love with, would soon return.


Before going to bed that night, I googled to see when Season 4 would begin. It wouldn’t. This was it. Ted Lasso was over. Maybe it’s a joke. How could they stop now? I wanted assurance each of the characters would find their happiness. After all, Ted, Rebecca, and Keeley deserve a Disney ending.


Maybe you’re wondering what’s so special about Ted Lasso. If you’ve watched the series, I’m guessing you understand. But if you haven’t, I’ll try to explain. For me, part is the soccer component, as I spent years watching and managing our sons’ soccer teams. But it’s so much more than that. I relate to Ted, Rebecca, Keeley, Roy, Jamie, and even Nate … who they are and how each evolves.


At first, the plot seemed bizarre. Why would anyone hire a football coach from Kansas to manage a British soccer team? Quickly, you learn it’s because the owner—who “won” AFC Richmond in a divorce settlement—wants the team to lose to punish her ex-husband. Yet, Ted positively impacts his players through unconventional and somewhat questionable coaching methods. Clearly, his lessons apply to more than sports. They hold truth in life.


As I watched the final episode—unaware it was the last—I felt a tear fall down my cheek. Perhaps deep down I knew it was over. After all, there were clues. All sorts of “conclusions” occurred at the end of the show. (I’d share, but that would require a spoiler alert!) However, it was later that evening, while under the warm and cozy covers bed covers, that tears returned. This time, there was more than one.


Sure, I’d miss Ted Lasso, but being disappointed about a favorite series ending would not cause me to cry like this. Knowing myself, I understood there had to be something underneath. Could I be mourning something bigger? If so, what?


It’s then I realized Ted Lasso was a trigger … it wasn't about a TV show coming to a natural ending… I was grieving other closures in my life.


Often, we hide our emotions, perhaps afraid that if we allow ourselves to fully feel, the pain would be too much. That’s why we stuff our feelings deep inside, hoping they naturally resolve themselves, so we won’t have to.


Nevertheless, acknowledging the beauty of what was while accepting an invitation into the unknown can be exciting and provide opportunities for growth. While it can be challenging to leave our safe and comfortable zone, saying goodbye does not diminish the importance or impact of what we leave behind.


Maybe you can relate. Perhaps you’ve had a natural ending of your own. Though it may have been difficult, you knew it was time.


I wish Jason Sudeikis would write at least one more season. I’d like to watch Roy continue to evolve … see who Keeley ends up with … and know how Richmond plays next season. But I suppose these scenes are not meant to be. I’ll have to live with the uncertainty of how things might have turned out.


Could that be the lesson? While it would be lovely, we can’t always know the endings—of our favorite TV shows or life in general. Sometimes, we just have to trust it all works out.


Trust, let go, believe … the best is yet to come.


How interesting our human experience would be if we allowed more natural endings to occur instead of fighting to keep what’s ready to leave. After all, it’s in the letting go that the magic happens.


Accepting endings is never easy, but with each farewell, we create space for something new. And if things truly do happen for a reason, then it’s time to say adieu to Ted and company. I’m sure another series will capture my attention. But, in the meantime, if I feel the need for a dose of Ted and his wisdom, there are always reruns.


Goodbyes don’t have to be forever. Sometimes it’s just time for us to write our next chapter.



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